CITIZENS AGAINST GOVERNMENT WASTE IDENTIFIES $17.7 BILLION IN PORK-BARREL SPENDING | Citizens Against Government Waste

CITIZENS AGAINST GOVERNMENT WASTE IDENTIFIES $17.7 BILLION IN PORK-BARREL SPENDING

Press Release

Embargoed for ReleaseContact: Jim Campi or Aaron Taylor
April 5, 2000 at 1:30 p.m.(202) 467-5300

 

CAGW’s annual Pig Book divulges record-breaking amount of congressional pork

(Washington, D.C.) – At a news conference held this afternoon, Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW) again ripped the lid off pork-barrel spending with the unveiling of its 2000 Congressional Pig Book Summary.  The 365 pork-barrel items targeted in the Pig Book Summary were gleaned from a larger list of 4,326 earmarks that will cost taxpayers $17.7 billion this year.

“No matter how you slice it, pork is always on the menu in Washington,” remarked CAGW President Thomas A. Schatz.  “In fiscal 2000, Congress went whole-hog, porking up the various spending bills with billions of dollars in worthless earmarks.  Our elected representatives simply couldn’t resist the lure of easy money, putting their partisan political interests above the best interests of taxpayers.”

According to Schatz, Congress indulged itself with $17.7 billion in pork-barrel spending in fiscal 2000 – blowing away all previous records for pork.  The total cost to taxpayers was 47 percent higher than fiscal 1999, and 22 percent higher than the previous record of $14.5 billion set in fiscal 1997.  The number of projects also increased dramatically, exceeding last year’s earmarks by 52 percent.

This year marks a financial milestone for the Pig Book.  Since the first Pig Book was published in 1991, CAGW has catalogued nearly 18 thousand pork-barrel projects.  The cost of these projects exceeds $100 billion.

In fiscal 2000, Alaska led the country with $636 per capita ($394 million) in pork, more than the next two largest per-capita porkers combined.  Those runners up were Hawaii with $264 per capita ($313 million) and Mississippi with $205 per capita ($570 million).  The common thread among the top three per capita states is that they are represented by powerful senators and appropriators – Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.), Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Ted Stevens (R-Alaska), and Senate appropriator Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii).

Of course, Congress was not solely to blame for the outrageous amount of pork in this year’s spending bills.  The President also chose to keep the bacon frying.  “President Clinton was an

 

Sign Up For Email Updates


Optional Member Code