Defense

MEADS Test "Successful," Cost and Purpose Uncertain

In an apparent last-ditch attempt to secure funding for the troubled Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS) program, MEADS International, the primary contractor comprised of Lockheed Martin and MBDA, conducted a flight test at the White Sands Missile Range on November 17, 2011. According to a press release, the test “demonstrated an unprecedented over-the-shoulder launch of the MSE [missile segment enhancement] missile against a simulated target attacking from behind.” Even though the U.S. and Germany have already indicated that they do not intend to undertake the acquisition phase of MEADS, funding has been approved for two flight tests. An intercept flight test is scheduled for the end of 2012. It is unclear how much these tests will cost.

GAO Skewers United Launch Alliance Contract Plans

The Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) program began in 1995 and was designed to allow the Department of Defense (DOD) access to space with the intention of reducing the cost of satellite launches by at least 25 percent while striving for up to 50 percent. Four contractors were initially approved to compete for the contract, but two EELVs were eventually selected: Boeing’s Delta IV and Lockheed Martin’s Atlas V.

Senate Backtracks on MEADS, Supplies Earmark

Created in 1995, the Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS) is a collaborative missile defense project intended to replace the Patriot Missile system, which has been used by the U.S. and its allies for decades.  A Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S., Germany, and Italy required that the U.S. pony up 58 percent of the development costs, with Germany covering 25 percent and Italy paying 17 percent.  The U.S. has already spent $1.9 billion on the design and development phase of MEADS, but the program has been plagued with cost overruns of $2 billion and is 10 years behind schedule.

To Honor The Fallen, Stop Wasting Money

When the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was established in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, lawmakers decreed that the new House and Senate Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittees would not accept earmark requests. The decision to keep earmarking out of DHS funding decisions seemed to show that members of Congress truly believed in protecting national security. It also made the point that elected officials in Washington know how easy it is for opportunistic legislators to leverage a crisis for parochial benefit.

Progress in Campaign to End MEADS

Created in 1995, the Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS) is a collaborative missile defense project intended to replace the Patriot Missile system, which has been used by the U.S. and its allies for decades. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the U.S., Germany, and Italy required that the U.S. pony up 58 percent of the development costs, with Germany covering 25 percent and Italy paying 17 percent. The U.S. has already spent $1.9 billion on the design and development phase of MEADS, but the program has been plagued with cost overruns of $2 billion and is 10 years behind schedule.

CAGW Issues Spending Cut Alert: Department of Defense Appropriations



For Immediate Release:

July 20, 2011
Contact: Leslie Paige 202.467.5334

Luke Gelber 202.467.5318
   

Senate Releases MilCon/VA Bill With Earmarks

For Immediate Release:
July 11, 2011
Contact:Leslie K. Paige (202) 467-5334
Luke Gelbe (202) 467-5318

 

The Pig Book is Alive and Well


For Immediate Release:

June 24, 2011
Contact: Leslie K. Paige (202) 467-5334

Luke Gelber (202) 467-5318

 


Pages

Sign Up for Email Updates!Click Here!

CAGW Names Rep. Elijah Cummings November 2017 Porker of the Month

Rep. Cummings is CAGW's November Porker of the Month for attempting to place price controls on prescription drugs.