CAGW Releases October 2016 WasteWatcher

For Immediate Release Contact: Curtis Kalin 202-467-5318
October 20, 2016  

(Washington, D.C.) – Today Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW) released its October 2016 WasteWatcher, a monthly dispatch to members of the news media, highlighting some of the most prominent fiscal issues affecting American taxpayers.  The stories from its October edition of WasteWatcher are listed in part as follows:

Show Me the Budget

By Sean Kennedy

Americans might fondly remember many experiences from 1996, including watching “Independence Day” and “Jerry Maguire,” reading about the cloning of Dolly the sheep, dancing to the Macarena, and surfing new websites such as Ask Jeeves and eBay.  That year also witnessed a rare, if more important event:  Congress completing the budget process on time.  Read the full story here.

Washington’s 2016 Year-End Spending Spree

By Curtis Kalin

As federal fiscal years wind down, a frustrating ritual takes place throughout departments and agencies:  a spending surge on frivolous items in order to avoid budget cuts in the next fiscal year.  The final month of fiscal year 2016 is no exception.  Read the full story here.

The Long Musical Road Home

By Deborah Collier

Unlike John Denver, Willie Nelson, and Dolly Parton, many songwriters do not perform the music they write, depending only on songwriter royalty compensation for their income.  In addition to managing the creative aspect of penning notes and words on sheet music, they must also navigate the process of protecting and licensing their intellectual property.  Read the full story here.

The Cover Oregon Debacle

By Elizabeth Wright

On September 15, 2016, and with little hubbub beyond the state’s borders, Oregon and Oracle, the prime vendor for the state’s Obamacare’s online marketplace exchange “Cover Oregon,” announced they had reached a settlement in a lawsuit.  The dispute revolved around who was at fault for the website’s colossal failure.  Read the full story here.

Unauthorized Spending, Sacred Cows, and the Need for Training Wheels

By William M. Christian

CAGW has long advocated for reforms to the way that Congress does business, focused on senators and representatives who turn blind eyes to ever-increasing spending.  One such reform, introduced on March 14, 2016 by Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash.) is H.R. 4730, the Unauthorized Spending Accountability (USA) Act.  Read the full story here.

Upstate New York Film Project Flops

By Ally Schatz

According to the MPAA, the American film industry currently supports 1.9 million workers and contributes $41 billion to more than 345,000 businesses in a given year in the United States alone.  However, when state officials decide to dabble in the movie making business, the plotline often takes an unfortunate twist and taxpayers become unwilling extras.  Read the full story here.

Possessed by Pensions: Impending Union Bailouts

By Rachel Cole

With Halloween around the corner, teenagers and adults alike will dust off classic scary movies, ranging from the comical (Ghostbusters) to the terrifying (The Exorcist).  Like these and other scary movies, Congress is on the verge of yet another horror show that has been seen too many times:  a taxpayer-funded bailout.  Read the full story here.

Land of the Free and Home of the Subsidies

By Andrew Nehring

Renewable energy politics has become a powerful force at both the federal and state level.  Wind and solar advocates argue that renewable energy generates power without the expense of burning fossil fuels.  While this may sound appealing, the reality is that this energy supply is highly subsidized and the policies are fossilized.  Read the full story here.

CAGW is the nation’s largest nonpartisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to eliminating waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement in government.

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