Intellectual Property

Set-Top Box Proposal Takes Center Stage

Technology innovations are great, and the advancement of the electronics industry over the past 20 years has been astounding.  However, when the federal government steps in to mandate technology, typically progress comes to a halt.  Such is the case with the set-top box.  The cable industry has been in the process of moving away from using these dusty dinosaurs of video viewing by developing apps that consumers will be able to load on any device to view their programming.  Sounds great, right?

The God of Communications is Alive and Well at the FCC

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler is doing his best to emulate Mercury, the God of Communications, whose portfolio also covered commerce and transportation.  (He was also known as a trickster and guided people into the Underworld.)

The chairman has imposed ancient communications laws on the Internet, usurped the Federal Trade Commission’s role on privacy enforcement, and now wants to undermine intellectual property rights by holding and issuing copyrights to creators and owners of licensed broadcast material. 

Copyright Office Details Problems with FCC Set-Top Box Proposal

On August 3, 2016, the Register of Copyrights sent a letter to four members of Congress, detailing potential copyright violations that could occur if the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) proposed rulemaking on set-top boxes is implemented, requiring multi-channel video programming distributors (MVPDs) to provide access to content, video programming guides, and subscriber data to third parties.  The Copyright Office is concerned whether the FCC can meet its objective of promoting set-top box competition and

We Stand with the Competitive Enterprise Institute

Rather than tilting at windmills trying to solve problems that don’t exist, government agencies should proceed with great care before imposing technical mandates on an industry.  Unfortunately, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) appears to be taking a “shoot from the hip” approach to regulating, and currently has its sights set on abrogating intellectual property (IP) rights.

CAGW Submits Comments to FCC Opposing AllVid

(Washington, D.C.) – Today, Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW) President Tom Schatz submitted public comments to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in opposition to the February 18, 2016 notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) on set-top boxes (AllVid). 

AllVid Not All It’s Cracked Up To Be

After imposing antiquated Title II regulations on the Internet, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is trying to take the next step in regulating every aspect of telecommunications.  Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler wants to mandate technical standards for set-top boxes that will ultimately hurt consumers by stifling innovation that is already moving towards eliminating the need for these boxes entirely.  Just as technology is being developed to send the set-top box the way of the dodo, the chairman and his supporters at the FCC are acting like a bunch of dodos and trying to keep them in homes across the country.

2016 IP Index Offers "Infinite Possibilities"

On February 10, 2016, the U.S Chamber of Commerce released its fourth annual IP index, Infinite Possibilities, which reviews and rates intellectual property (IP) rights and protections around the world.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership and Intellectual Property

On October 5, 2015, negotiations for the TPPA concluded and a summary of the 30 chapters of the agreement was released.  Chapter 18 of the agreement specifically discusses the rights and responsibilities of each TPP member nation in protecting IP.  The 12 TPPA member nations are Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States, and Vietnam. 

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CAGW Names Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand May 2018 Porker of the Month

Sen. Gillibrand is CAGW's Porker of the Month her proposal to force the fiscally-imperiled United States Postal Service to expand into banking.